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    • Gluten Intolerance: What Is It?

      Gluten Intolerance

      In the past it has been believed that gluten intolerance was caused by coeliac disease and wheat allergy. However, in recent times, studies have shown that some people display symptoms of gluten intolerance but don't actually suffer from coeliac disease. This new syndrome has been named non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). NCGS is believed to be the most common gluten related disorder. Other names that NCGS could possibly go by are gluten sensitivity, gluten hypersensitivity or non-coeliac gluten intolerance.

      The cause is poorly understood however specific gene variants have been known to be associated with NCGS.

      Symptoms of NCGS usually start after consumption of gluten, and go away once gluten is removed from the diet and relapse following gluten challenge.

      Signs and Symptoms of NCGS

      Gastrointestinal Symptoms

      • Abdominal pain
      • Diarrhoea
      • Nausea
      • Vomiting
      • Bloating
      • Excess flatulence

      Systemic Symptoms

      • Behavioural symptoms
      • Bone or joint pain
      • Muscle cramps
      • Leg numbness
      • Weight loss
      • Chronic fatigue
      • Headaches
      • "Foggy mind"
      • Eczema and/or rash

      If you expect gluten intolerance you can test this yourself by removing gluten from your diet. Try it out for a while and see if you feel better.

      Some Gluten Containing Foods to Watch Out For:

      • Wheat and wheat products (spelt, kamut, titricale)
      • Rye
      • Barley
      • Oats (although some research suggests oat consumption is ok for many people, it is actually the issue of being contaminated with wheat, barley, rye)
      • Pasta
      • Bread
      • Biscuits
      • Cakes
      • Baked goods
      • Pastries

      Other Considerations

      Wheat and other gluten-containing grains contain a protein called gliadin, which has been shown to increase zonulin production. Research on zonulin has shown an increase in intestinal permeability (also known as leaky gut) in humans and other animals.

      Many autoimmune diseases- including coeliac disease, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease- have been identified in medical literature as being characterised by increasingly high levels of zonulin and a leaky gut.

      So the point here would be that there may be many reasons why you might want to try a gluten free diet, even if you don't suffer from coeliac disease.


      If you are unsure about anything you have read in this article, please do not hesitate to contact us on (03) 9670 1346 or evefaye@bigpond.net.au or comment on this post.

      Our team of qualified staff are here to help you.


      Written by Tanya Lim

      Medical Herbalist & Nutritionist at Evelyn Faye Nutrition

      www.tanyalim.com.au

      360 Bourke Street, Melbourne, 3000

    • Prolonged Flu Season: How Can I Best Protect Myself?

      flu season

      Spring has sprung but beware, the flu season is not over yet. It has been reported that this year Australia is experiencing a record flu season, with 71,256 lab-confirmed cases of the flu being reported. The real number of cases is likely to be much higher, due to many cases not being tested.

      How To Protect Yourself

      Nobody is 100% protected from getting the flu, however there are some steps that you can take to help protect yourself. Make sure you are taking care of your health to ensure your immune system is functioning optimally in order to fight off chances of contracting flu.

      Here are some steps to make sure your immune system is strong:

      • Eat a balanced and healthy diet rich in fruit and vegetables
      • Get regular exercise
      • Get plenty of sleep
      • Manage stress
      • Take vitamins and minerals to strengthen and support immune function.

      Specific Nutrients for the Immune System

      Zinc

      Zinc is essential for all processes of the human body, as well as having a wide range of different roles in immunity. A deficiency in this trace element can severely affect the immune response.

      Vitamin C

      Studies on individuals under extreme physical stress including marathon runners and skiers showed that taking vitamin C reduced the common cold risk by half. Another group of scientists found that vitamin C use (over 500mg per day) reduced the frequency of the common cold but did not affect the duration or severity.

      Vitamin D

      Animal and human studies involving vitamin D supplementation have shown beneficial effects of vitamin D on immune function, particularly in the context of autoimmunity.

      In addition to these vitamins, herbs such as echinacea, astragalus, cat's claw and andrographis can be beneficial in strengthening your immune system and reducing the severity and length of colds and flu.

      Additional Ways to Reduce Your Chances of Getting the Flu:

      • Wash hands regularly
      • Keep surfaces clean
      • Avoid sharing cups and cutlery
      • Cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing

      If you are thinking of getting a flu jab or think you are protected because you've been vaccinated, think again. A recent outbreak of influenza A in a Tasmanian nursing home affected 31 of 37 residents, despite 95% of them having had the flu vaccination.


      If you are unsure about anything you have read in this article, please do not hesitate to contact us on (03) 9670 1346 or evefaye@bigpond.net.au or comment on this post.

      Our team of qualified staff are here to help you.


      Written by Tanya Lim

      Medical Herbalist & Nutritionist at Evelyn Faye Nutrition

      www.tanyalim.com.au

      360 Bourke Street, Melbourne, 3000

    • Product Spotlight: Nordur Sea Salt

      nordur

      Nordur Sea Salt from Iceland has just arrived.

      Features

      • 100% Pure and Organically Certified
      • More trace elements than all other salts on the market due to the seaweed-rich pure Icelandic waters it is harvested from
      • 100% Sustainably Resourced
      • Free from Greenhouse Gas Omissions
      • No Industrial Processing

      But there is more....

      They also produce flavoured salts including Rhubarb, Blueberry, Smoked and Liquorice. Why? Because spice blends help elevate your cooking to another level. They are extremely versatile and can spruce up just about anything; for example soups, sandwiches, vegetables, seafood, side dishes, grills, deserts and even chips.

      In 2016, Nordur was awarded the best packaging and best product at the Paris Food Fair and was awarded best packaging at the New York Food Fair.

       

      If you are unsure about anything you have read in this article, please do not hesitate to contact us on (03) 9670 1346 or evefaye@bigpond.net.au or comment on this post.

      Our team of qualified staff are here to help you.


      Written by Ian Collins

      Owner of Evelyn Faye Nutrition

    • Cold & Flu: What Can I Do?

      Everybody is coughing and spluttering. We are all crying out for help to fight off the nasty colds and flu's that are so prevalent this time of year.

      How Can I Avoid This?

      There are two equally great supplements that you can use to help prevent and help cure winter illnesses- Zinc and Vitamin C.

      Herbs of Gold Vitamin C 1000 plus Zinc and Bioflavonoids- a dose of four a day will provide you with 4000mg of Vitamin C and 32mg of Zinc. This means that it is a perfect product for cold and flu prevention.

      If your chest is filling up with phlegm and you are coughing, then adding something like Fusion Cough Lung Tonic to your daily supplements. It comes in both capsules and liquid and should help soothe your chest and help you cough the phlegm out.

      Maybe you are just suffering from the flu- aching, sore throat, possibly your second dose for the winter- (yes, central heating at work can be a problem) try taking Fusion Astra 8 Immune Tonic. This product comes in tablets or liquid and can help give your immune system a bit of a boost.

      Propolis can also be good to help prevent colds and flu's. Propolis and Manuka Honey together can be an effective combination as well.

      If your throat is really bugging you, Manuka Health's Manuka Honey and Propolis Suckles can be a very pleasant and helpful way to ease throat irritation.

      For a different approach, Hilbilby Cultured Food Fire Tonic could be the product for you. It contains raw Apple Cider Vinegar tincture, live with the MOTHER of vinegar. It also contains Turmeric, Horseradish, Ginger, Carrot, Celery, Garlic, Lemons, Juniper Berries, Parsley, Black Peppercorn, Oregano and Thyme. All these ingredients are brought together and made in Torquay, Victoria.

      For a range of immune issues including extreme tiredness and chronic fatigue symptoms, as well as for general prevention, an immune formula may be all you need. We highly recommend Natures Origins Immune Advanced.

      Get well quickly!


      Written by Ian Collins

      Owner of Evelyn Faye Nutrition

    • Spotlight On: Turmeric

      In the natural health world, everybody seems to be talking about Turmeric. This wonder herb has been touted to help everything from arthritis to depression. So how does this herb work?

      One of the main active constituents of Turmeric is a polyphenol called curcumin (diferuloylmethane), and is what gives turmeric its bright yellow colour. It is a potent anti-inflammatory.

      Turmeric is a common ingredient used in curries, although curries contain a very small amount of curcumin and can vary significantly depending on the quality of the turmeric and how it has been processed.

      Turmeric Health Benefits

      Curcumin can impact health by targeting a wide variety of biochemical mechanisms. It can affect the expression and activity of many enzyme pathways, including cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, glutathione-S-transferase, and cytochrome P450 as well as modulating transcription factors, growth factors, growth factor receptors, and their associated signaling pathways (such as epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor 2, AP-1, nuclear factor B, and Nrf2). In addition to this, it has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

      In recent years, curcumin has been researched extensively for its antioxidant, immunomodulatory, and anti-inflammatory properties, with compelling evidence to support its efficacy within a number of disease conditions.

      Alleviation of Arthritic Disease

      Animal studies have shown reduced tissue inflammation and inflammatory mediators as well as a decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines.

      Alleviation of Gastrointestinal Tract Disorders

      Clinical evidence suggests that curcumin may help alleviate the symptoms associated with gastrointestinal disorders such as Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, as well as reducing intestinal inflammation.

      Neurodegenerative Disorders and Cognition

      Curcumin has shown anti-inflammatory properties that could counteract neurodegeneration in vitro studies. Some animal studies suggest improved memory function and cognition in Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia and aging. Additional improvements in symptoms of dementia have been displayed by curcumin's ability to lower serum cholesterol and lipid peroxides, and inhibiting platelet aggregation.

      Counteracting oxidative stress and traumatic brain injury is also of related interest.

      Depression

      Serotonin availability was originally thought to be the main implication in the cause of major depression, but studies have now shown that many different biological disturbances are involved. This has sparked interest in compounds such as curcumin that aim to target some of these different pathways, such as dysregulation in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, activation of immune inflammatory pathways, increased oxidative and nitrosative stress, neuroprogression, and mitochondrial dysfunction.

      Some other conditions where the use of curcumin have shown promising results include:

      • Diabetes and metabolic syndrome
      • Cardio-protective properties
      • Allergy

       

      If you are unsure about anything you have read in this article, please do not hesitate to contact us on (03) 9670 1346 or evefaye@bigpond.net.au or comment on this post.

      Our team of qualified staff are here to help you.


      References

      • Aggarwal B, Harikumar K. Potential therapeutic effects of curcumin, the anti-inflammatory agent in turmeric, against neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases. Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2009;41:40Y59.
      • Holt P, Katz S, Kirshoff R. Curcumin therapy in inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot study. Dig Dis Sci. 2005;50:2191Y2193.
      • Jaqetia G, Aggarwal B. ‘‘Spicing up’’ of the immune system by curcumin. J Clin Immunol. 2007;27:19Y35
      • Lopresti, A. L., Maes, M., Maker, G. L., Hood, S. D., & Drummond, P. D. (2014). Curcumin for the treatment of major depression: A randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 167, 368-375. doi:10.1016/j.jad.2014.06.001
      • Ng S, Kamm M. Therapeutic strategies for the management of ulcerative colitis. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2009;15:935Y950.
      • Singletary, K. (2010). Turmeric. Nutrition Today, 45(5), 216-225. doi:10.1097/nt.0b013e3181f1d72c

      Written by Tanya Lim

      Medical Herbalist & Nutritionist at Evelyn Faye Nutrition

      www.tanyalim.com.au

      360 Bourke Street, Melbourne, 3000

    • The Human Microbiome: What Is It?

      There has been much hype recently about the microbiome and its effect on health, but what exactly is it, and how does it impact on our health?

      What Is the Microbiome?

      Put simply, the microbiome is the community of microbes in our gut. This community is sometimes known as the microbiota.

      Why Is It Important?

      Well, the human microbiome (all of our microbes' genes) outnumber our genome by about 100 to 1. Bacteria are 1000 times smaller than human cells, and weigh about 2% of our body mass, which is roughly 1.5kg in an adult. To put this into perspective, the human brain weighs approximately 1.4kg.

      How Does This Impact Our Health?

      The microbes in our gut can impact health in many ways, including:

      • Digestion of food
      • Prevent pathogens from invasion
      • Enhance the function of the intestinal cell wall, improving tight junctions (which regulate the permeability of the intestinal barrier, which when compromised, can lead to leaky gut)
      • Modulate the immune system
      • Inhibit cell death

      The formation of our microbiome starts during the gestational period, so as part of a prenatal nutrition plan, it is worth considering supplementing with probiotics. Other ways of ensuring you give your children the best chance of a healthy microbiota include breastfeeding and frequent exposure to pets and animals. Another important consideration is to let your children play outside in the dirt (this is known as the hygiene hypothesis).

      Other Important Considerations

      Antibiotics

      After taking antibiotics your gut microbes, both good and bad, get killed off. That is why supplementing with a high dose multi-strain probiotic is important to recolonize the gut.

      Conditions that could benefit from supplementing with probiotics:

      • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
      • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
      • Infectious diarrhea
      • Eczema
      • Leaky gut
      • Candida
      • With/post antibiotic use

      Foods that contain probiotics include:

      • Yoghurt
      • Some soft cheeses
      • Miso
      • Tempeh
      • Kefir
      • Kim Chi
      • Sauerkraut
      • Pickled foods

      What About Strains?

      There are many different micro-organisms used in probiotic supplements, with different strains being used for certain health conditions. Talk to your naturopath, nutritionist or herbalist to discuss which probiotic may be most beneficial for you.

      Some Suggested Supplements

      NutriVital Premium 50 Billion Probiotic +

      Healthy Essentials Broad Spectrum Probiotic 10

      Gelatin Health Digestive Health

       

      If you are unsure about anything you have read in this article, please do not hesitate to contact us on (03) 9670 1346 or evefaye@bigpond.net.au or comment on this post.

      Our team of qualified staff are here to help you.


      Written by Tanya Lim

      Medical Herbalist & Nutritionist at Evelyn Faye Nutrition

      www.tanyalim.com.au

      360 Bourke Street, Melbourne, 3000

    • Purple Gut Healing Kraut

      kraut

      Ingredients

      • 1/2 Purple Cabbage - set aside outer leaf
      • 1 Onion
      • 2 Garlic Cloves (or as you prefer)
      • 2 tablespoons of Fresh Ginger Root & Fresh Turmeric
      • 2 teaspoons of Himalayan Salt
      • Pinch of Black Pepper

      Method

      1. Keep the larger outer leaves of the cabbage put aside, you'll need it later for keeping the kraut submerged.
      2. Shred the cabbage up with a knife to very fine, thin pieces. Do the same with the onion and garlic.
      3. Grate both the ginger and the turmeric with fine micro plane grater.
      4. Put all ingredients into a bowl and mix well.
      5. Let it sit for about 30 minutes so that the cabbage becomes juicy.
      6. Put all ingredients into a big jar with a lid, including all the salty cabbage juice. Press this mixture right down so the cabbage is submerged under the liquid.
      7. Place one of the larger outer leaf of the cabbage over the surface of the sliced cabbage. This will help keep the cabbage submerged in the liquid.
      8. Place a weight on top. I use a smaller mason jar filled with water.
      9. Cover everything with a towel. Set in a cool place, out of sunlight for 7 days.
      10. Check the sauerkraut every day and press the weight down a few times to release the gases that are inside. Always keep everything covered with liquid.
      11. After 7 days, remove the leaves and place the finished sauerkraut in the refrigerator. It will last at least 9 months or longer in your fridge.

      Recipe by

      Kayla Elizabeth Miller

      Clinical Holistic Nutritionist at our South Melbourne store

      BHSc. Nutritional Medicine

    • The Rise of Oestrogen Dominance

      Did you know you might be eating foods that are disrupting your hormones and causing your oestrogen levels to elevate? This can be detrimental on many levels, and cause unwanted side effects for both men and women.

      What Are These Side Effects?

      For men, more feminine like characteristics including gynecomastia (also known as man boobs) and excess weight carried around the mid section.

      For women, hypothyroidism, autoimmune conditions, chronic fatigue, and menstrual disharmonies such as fibroids, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), ovarian cysts, irregular menstrual bleeding and PMS.

       

      Too much oestrogen can disrupt the balance of the entire endocrine system. Oestrogen is ubiquitous in nature in many different forms, and we are constantly consuming oestrogen whether we realise it or not.

      Foods To Avoid

      Soy

      Soy contains way to much oestrogen, not to mention the fact that most soy is genetically modified and sprayed with a high amount of pesticides (also a big contributor of xenoestrogens to our environment).

      Sugar

      Too much sugar can increase oestrogen in your body.

      Commercially-Raised Meat and Dairy

      Try to buy hormone-free meats and dairy products to avoid hormones and pesticides.

      Xenoestrogens

      In addition to foods that contain oestrogen, we are constantly dealing with oestrogens in our environment. These are called xenoestrogens, which are oestrogen mimicking in the body. When xenoestrogens make their way into the body, they attach themselves to cell receptors, replacing natural oestrogens' functions.

      Xenoestrogens to Avoid

      Plastic containers containing BPA (Bisphenol A)

      BPA is known to mimic oestrogen. In recent years scientists around the world have found a link to BPA and a myriad of health defects in rodents, including mammary and prostate cancer, genital defects in males, early onset of puberty in females and obesity to name a few.

      Cosmetics, Lotions, Soaps, Toothpastes, Air Fresheners, Household Cleaning Products, and Laundry Detergents

      Xenoestrogens absorbed by the skin are more potent as they go directly to the tissue instead of passing through the liver. Try to choose organic plant-based products when possible.

      How to Minimise the Harmful Effects of Oestrogen Excess and Xenoestrogen Exposure

      Detox your body from excess oestrogens by eating cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale and Chinese cabbage.

      These vegetables contain a substance called indole-3-carbinol (I-3-C), which starts out as sulfur in your body.  I-3-C is also available in supplement form. Consult your local Naturopath, Herbalist or Nutritionist to discuss whether supplementing with I-3-C or other oestrogen detoxing nutrients could benefit you.

      Other Supplements to Help Detox Oestrogens from the Body

      St Mary’s Thistle (Herbs of Gold and Nature's Sunshine)

      Dandelion Root (Nature's Sunshine, Hilde Hemmes Herbal, and Southern Light Herbs)

      Burdock (Southern Light Herbs and Nature's Sunshine)

      For Men

      Alpha Mars – Alpha Mars contains herbs that increase natural testosterone production, thereby down regulating oestrogen.

       

      If you are unsure about whether or not you should be taking a supplement for excess oestrogen, do not hesitate to contact us on (03) 9670 1346 or evefaye@bigpond.net.au

      Our team of qualified staff are here to help you.


      Written by Tanya Lim

      Medicinal Herbalist & Nutritionist at Evelyn Faye Nutrition

      360 Bourke Street, Melbourne, 3000

    • Medicinal Benefits of Lavender

      lavender

      What Is Lavender?

      Lavender is common around southern Europe, Australia, and the US. It is a strongly aromatic shrub that grows to about 60cm, with pinkish purple flowers, evergreen leaves and leafless stems.

      Medicinally the violet flowers are used to extract the fragrant scent and is used in essential oil, but it’s also used as a tea and in herbal extract supplements.

      The oil can be used as a relaxant with massage therapy. It can be used on your pillow, in a bath, or made into soap.

      Lavender can be a remedy for ailments such as insomnia, anxiety, stress, depression and fatigue. Research has found that lavender has a calming, soothing, and sedative effect when inhaled.

      A small number of studies have reported that when Lavender is used in essential oil, it can be beneficial for alopecia (hair loss) and postoperative pain.

      There are further studies taking place on Lavender for it’s antibacterial and antiviral properties.

      Traditionally, pillows were filled with lavender flowers to help restless people fall sleep.

      Insomnia or Agitation

      Scientific evidence suggests that using lavender in aromatherapy may slow activity of the nervous system, improve sleep quality, promote relaxation, and lift mood in people suffering from sleep disorders.

      Alopecia Areata

      Research suggests that people with alopecia who massaged their scalps with lavender and other essential oils daily for 7 months experienced significant hair regrowth.

      Some Supplements

      Lavender Essential Oil

      Southern Light Herbs Lavender (Loose Leaf)

       

      If you are unsure about anything, do not hesitate to contact us on (03) 9670 1346 or evefaye@bigpond.net.au

      Our team of qualified staff are here to help you.


      Written by Tanya Lim

      Medicinal Herbalist & Nutritionist at Evelyn Faye Nutrition

      360 Bourke Street, Melbourne, 3000

    • BCAA Ratios: What Do They Mean?

      BCAA

      Now that BCAA’s (Branched Chain Amino Acids) are one of the most purchased sports supplements it makes sense to discuss the different ratio’s and what this means to someone considering using them or to those who might already be using them and are considering a change of product.

      The three amino acids contained in BCAA’s are Leucine, Isoleucine and Valine.

      Ratios

      The ratio refers to the amount of each amino contained in the product in the order laid out i.e. 2/1/1 (2)Leucine/(1)Isoleucine/(1)Valine so simply the product will be 50% Leucine, 25% Isoleucine, and 25% Valine.

      So a higher ratio product 12/1/1 will have (12)Leucine/(1)Isoleucine/(1)Valine which means the product will be 86% Leucine, 7% Isoleucine, and 7% Valine.

      Leucine converts to HMB, which is the compound that encourages protein synthesis. Simply put, it helps with generating muscle fibre. Isoleucine and Valine, like many other amino acids, become building blocks in these protein chains.

      Leucine to HMB conversion can be dose dependant meaning the more Leucine you consume the more HMB you may generate. The more HMB you create the more muscle fibre you can repair and rebuild.

      Generally you will get 2.5 to 3.5 grams of Leucine in a scoop of protein powder and a certain amount will be ingested through food.

      Leucine, Isoleucine and Valine present in muscle in a 2/1/1 ratio which led to most research being done on this specific ratio. However if you take into account the individual biochemistry of each amino acid you may come to the conclusion that Leucine may be more relevant to consume in higher doses and may have a more specific action for muscle growth and repair.

      Are BCAAs For Me?

      You can consider BCAA supplementation if your muscle recovery is slow or you can use them to replace some of your protein powder intake.

      Is Timing Important?

      Contrary to popular thought BCAA timing is mostly unimportant. They provide little energy or recovery during a workout so can be consumed at any time throughout the day or night. They are absorbed in about 20 to 30 minutes and will be mostly used at night at rest.

      So check your product for Leucine content and consider how much protein powder you’re consuming and how your muscles are responding post training.

      Some Our Top Selling BCAA Supplements are....

      Giant Sports BCAA

      Gen-Tec Nutrition BCAAs 8-1-1

      SAN Pro BCAA

      Scivation Xtend BCAAs

      Optimum Nutrition Pro BCAA

       

      If you are unsure about whether or not you should be taking BCAAs, do not hesitate to contact us on (03) 9670 1346 or evefaye@bigpond.net.au

      Our team of qualified staff are here to help you.


      Written by Adam Rigby

      Sports Nutritionist at our Bourke Street Store

      360 Bourke Street, Melbourne, 3000

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